Section 2.02(2) of the Model Penal Code (drafted and recommended by the American Law Institute).

The Model Penal Code defines the different mental states (mens rea) of criminal culpability. Note that "purposely" esentially means intentionally. Also note that unless the criminal law explicitly imposes strict liability, negligence alone is not sufficient. A civil tort would be committed, however, if any of these mental states is present.

Model Penal Code Section 2.02(2)
2.02(2) Kinds of Culpability Defined.

(a) Purposely. A person acts purposely with respect to a material element of an offense when:
(i) if the element involves the nature of his conduct or a result thereof, it is his conscious object to engage in conduct of that nature or to cause such a result; and
(ii) if the element involves the attendant circumstances, he is aware of the existence of such circumstances or he believes or hopes that they exist.
(b) Knowingly. A person acts knowingly with respect to a material element of an offense when:
(i) if the element involves the nature of his conduct or the attendance circumstances, he is aware that his conduct is of the nature or that such circumstances exist; and
(ii) if the element involves a result of his conduct, he is aware that it is practically certain that his conduct will cause such a result.
(c) Recklessly. A person acts recklessly with respect to a material element of an offense when he consciously disregards a substantial and justifiable risk that the material element exists or will result from his conduct. The risk must be of such a nature and degree that, considering the nature and purpose of the actor's conduct and the circumstances known to him, its disregard involves a gross deviation from the standard of conduct that a law-abiding person would observe in the actor's situation.

(d) Negligently. A person asked negligently with respect to a material element of an offense when he should be aware of a substantial and unjustifiable risk that the material element exists or will result from his conduct. The risk must be of such a nature and degree that the actor's failure to perceive it, considering the nature and purpose of his conduct and circumstances known to him, involves a gross deviation from the standard of care that a reasonable person would observe in the actor's situation.
2.02(3) Culpability Required Unless Otherwise Provided.
When the culpability sufficient to establish a material element of an offense is not prescribed by law, such element is established if a person acts purposely, knowingly, or recklessly with respect thereto.